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Innovative Treatments for a Range of Diseases

Salix is a specialty pharmaceutical company that offers innovative treatments for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases and other disorders. For more than 30 years, we have licensed, developed, and marketed products to provide healthcare professionals (HCPs) and patients with effective treatment options.

Read more about these chronic and debilitating conditions:

Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy (OHE)

HE is a brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portal systemic shunting.1

Because a damaged liver cannot function normally (as in cirrhosis), toxins from the gut can enter the bloodstream and travel to the brain, where they affect neurotransmission. This can cause episodes of HE, which may present as alterations in consciousness, cognition, and behavior that range from minimal to severe.1-3

Overt HE occurs in 30% to 40% of patients with cirrhosis at some point during the clinical course of their disease.1 As the burden of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is increasing, the frequency of HE is also increasing.4,5

Learn more about a treatment for the reduction in risk of overt HE recurrence in adults.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Diarrhea (IBS-D)

IBS-D is a common disorder of the of the lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract.6 Up to 16 million Americans suffer from IBS-D.7 The symptoms of IBS-D can happen on a regular basis and vary widely, but often include abdominal pain and diarrhea.8

The cause of IBS-D is unknown, but may result from a disturbance in the way the gut, brain, and nervous system interact.8

Learn more about treatments for IBS-D.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome With Constipation (IBS-C), Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC)

Constipation is something that everyone has likely experienced at one time or another. Two types of long term constipation are Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C).9

The exact cause of these conditions is not known but may result from how the brain and the intestines communicate or changes in bacteria in the gut, among other factors.

Learn more about a treatments for CIC and IBS-C

Opioid-induced Constipation (OIC)

Constipation may be defined as having less than 3 bowel movements per week, plus one or more of the following characteristics: hard stools, the need for excessive straining, or a sense of incomplete bowel movements.10

Constipation can also be classified by etiology:

  • Primary constipation11
    • Results from intrinsic defects of colonic or anorectal function
    • Considered typically after secondary causes have been ruled out
  • Secondary constipation11
    • Caused by pathologic changes, such as disease or intestinal obstruction
    • Caused by medications (iatrogenic), such as opioids

Constipation is a frequent side effect of opioids12-15

  • Opioids are a major class of analgesics often used to relieve pain12
  • Constipation is one of the most common side effects of the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain 12,14,15

Learn more about treatments for OIC.

Bowel Preparation

A colonoscopy is one of the most important preventative care measures you can have done to reduce the risk of getting colon cancer. This procedure can help find and allow for the removal of growths (called polyps) before they become cancerous.16

To get ready for a colonoscopy, a full bowel prep is required. Your doctor will give you specific directions on how to prepare, but generally, all solids must be emptied from the stomach and bowel by following a clear liquid diet for 1-3 days before the procedure and a bowel prep taken.17

Learn more about a bowel preparation for colonoscopies.

Ulcerative Colitis (UC)18

UC is a disease that causes inflammation in the colon, which can lead to bleeding, production of pus, diarrhea, and abdominal or stomach discomfort. Over 900,000 Americans have UC, and it equally affects men and women.

UC is chronic, with no known cure. It is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), not to be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which does not cause inflammation in the colon.

Learn more about treatments for UC.

CYCLOSET®

(bromocriptine mesylate) 0.8 mg tablets

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PLENVU®

(polyethylene glycol 3350, sodium ascorbate, sodium sulfate, ascorbic acid, sodium chloride and potassium chloride for oral solution)

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RELISTOR®

(methylnaltrexone bromide) 8 mg/12 mg subcutaneous injection

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ANUSOL®-HC

(hydrocortisone) 2.5% cream

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ANUSOL®-HC

(hydrocortisone acetate) 25 mg suppository

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APRISO®

(mesalamine) 0.375 g extended-release capsules

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AZASAN®

(azathioprine) 75/100 mg tablets

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COLAZAL®

(balsalazide disodium) 750 mg capsules

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CYCLOSET®

(bromocriptine mesylate) 0.8 mg tablets

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DIURIL®

(chlorothiazide) 250 mg oral suspension

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FENOGLIDE®

(fenofibrate) tablets 120 mg & 40 mg

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GIAZO®

(balsalazide disodium) 1.1g tablets

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GLUMETZA®

(metformin) 500/1000 mg tablets

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MOVIPREP®

(PEG-3350, sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium ascorbate and ascorbic acid) 100 g/7.5 g/2.691 g/1.015 g/5.9 g/4.7 g for oral solution

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OSMOPREP®

(sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, USP, and sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous, USP) tablets

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PLENVU®

(polyethylene glycol 3350, sodium ascorbate, sodium sulfate, ascorbic acid, sodium chloride and potassium chloride for oral solution)

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PROCTOCORT ®

(hydrocortisone) 1% cream

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PROCTOCORT ®

(hydrocortisone acetate) 30 mg suppository

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RELISTOR®

(methylnaltrexone bromide) 8 mg/12 mg subcutaneous injection

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RELISTOR®

(methylnaltrexone bromide) 150 mg tablets

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UCERIS®

(budesonide) 9 mg extended-release tablets

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UCERIS®

(budesonide) 2 mg rectal foam

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XIFAXAN®

(rifaximin) 200 mg tablets

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ZEGERID®

(omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate) 20/40 mg capsules

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ZEGERID®

(omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate) 20/40 mg omeprazole and 1680 mg sodium bicarbonatepowder for oral suspension

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Giving Patients More

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Committed to connecting with healthcare professionals (HCPs)

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References: 1. Vilstrup H, Amodio P, Bajaj J, et al. Hepatic encephalopathy in chronic liver disease: 2014 Practice Guideline by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the European Association for the Study of the Liver. Hepatology. 2014;60(2):715-735. 2. Neff GW, Kemmer N, Duncan C, Alsina A. Update on the management of cirrhosis—focus on cost-effective preventative strategies. Clin Econ Outcomes Res. 2013;5:143-152. 3. Blei A, Cordoba J; The Practice Parameters Committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. Hepatic encephalopathy. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001;96(70):1968-1976. 4. Frederick RT. Current concepts in the pathophysiology and management of hepatic encephalopathy. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011;7(4):222-233. 5. Peery AF, Crockett SD, Barritt AS, et al. Burden of gastrointestinal, liver, and pancreatic diseases in the United States. Gastroenterol. 2015;147:1731-1741. 6. Mayo Clinic. Irritable bowel syndrome. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/irritable-bowel-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20024578. Accessed February 27, 2017. 7. Quick Facts. United States Census Bureau web site. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/PST045219. Accessed October 13, 2020. 8. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). Facts about IBS. http://www.aboutibs.org/facts-about-ibs.html. Accessed February 27, 2017. 9. Trulance. Types of Constipation. https://www.trulance.com/types-of-constipation/ 10. Lembo A, Camilleri M. Chronic constipation. N Engl J Med. 2003;349(14):1360-1368. 11. Andrews CN, Storr M. The pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Can J Gastroenterol. 2011;25(suppl B):16B-21B. 12. Sharma A, Jamal MM. Opioid induced bowel disease: a twenty-first century physicians' dilemma. Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2013;15(7):334. 13. Vanegas G, Ripamonti C, Sbanotto A, De Conno F. Side effects of morphine administration in cancer patients. Cancer Nurs. 1998;21(4):289-297. 14. Bell TJ, Panchal SJ, Miaskowski C, Bolge SC, Milanova T, Williamson R. The prevalence, severity, and impact of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction: results of a US and European patient survey (PROBE 1). Pain Med. 2009;10(1):35-42. 15. Kalso E, Edwards JE, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Opioids in chronic non-cancer pain: systematic review of efficacy and safety. Pain. 2004;112(3):372-380. 16. Clark. B, Laine. L. High-quality Bowel Preparation is Required for Detection of Sessile Serrate Polyps. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2016; 14:1155-1162. 17. Parro-Blanco. A, Ruiz. A, Alvarez-Lobos, M.et.al. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2014; 12: 20 (47):17709-17726. 18. Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation. What is ulcerative colitis? http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-ulcerative-colitis/. Accessed February 27, 2017.